Alana Flynn

Statement

I’m a Womenswear and Textile designer, specialising in print, both digital and screen printing, and embroidery. The areas I'm most passionate about for future employment are womenswear, garment, and accessory design where I can also use my knowledge and love of textiles in the design process.
I work primarily through 3D using processes such as painting, sculpting, enamelling, and metalwork to bring my textiles to life. I enjoy working with different techniques and textures as I find it brings more depth to my design process. Using 3D materials allows for more development and a hands-on organic approach to garment design. This way of working has made my design process very versatile. The pieces I design are taking inspiration from sculptures and research of theories such as the 'Disgust Theory' they are a moving, living piece of art.

Achievements & Experience

BA(Hons) Fashion Textiles, First Class, UWE Bristol, 2017-2020

Foundation Diploma fashion/textiles - Distinction, Northwest Regional College, Derry, Northern Ireland, 2015/16.

Featured Projects:

Grotesque Beauty

The inspiration for my collection is the taboos surrounding the nude female form and the social constructs attached. I wanted to stay away from the overly depicted female form so for my initial development and design I distorted the female silhouette with sponge and padding.

Grotesque Beauty

Working on top of that through drape the oversized fat-suits came to life. The scale is an indication that all bodies come in different colours, shapes, and sizes. This collection was created to draw attention to the social norms surrounding beauty and what we deem as beautiful and why.

Grotesque Beauty

Through the use of fabric and textile techniques, I wanted to convey the living skin, for the garments to be visually interactive with the viewer. Have a human flesh-like quality through touch and movement, capture human beauty flaws such as stretch marks, and rolls of fat through fabric manipulation.

Beautifully Flawed

Tribal scarification has been around for centuries and is still used today in many Western African tribes as a method to display social standing or religious beliefs.The scaring of the skin and the social constructs attached was the primary topic of inspiration for this collection.

Beautifully Flawed

I focused on fabric manipulation through processes such as machine embroidery and screen-printing taking inspiration from keloid scars. Fabrics such as vegan leather and wax-coated lycra were used to convey human skin and how it would fall if textured.

Beautifully Flawed

Manipulating copper and enamelling captured the torturing of the skin in an unusual 3d way. The scorch marks and the enamelling on the copper depicted the way scars form on the skin. Through digital print, the 3d pieces were transferred, by doing so were made fit for use on the